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It’s a watery blog, y’all!


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This month is all about water, water, water! This week I am literally diving into the water.


This blog will touch on why we might choose to filter our water and what types of filters we have to choose from—as well as which water to filter.


Before I get started, here is an awesome resource for all things water filter.

Ready to dive in (sorry, couldn’t resist)?


If we are on city water in the USA, our water is typically disinfected with chlorine. Yes, basically the same stuff people use to whiten clothing and sanitize swimming pools. We do this to make sure we aren’t spreading waterborne diseases. Very important, but.


We drink that stuff?


Yes. In minute amounts. But, in my experience, minute things add up. I don’t relish the notion of drinking anything related to bleach or swimming-pool water, so except in very small doses I do not choose to drink unfiltered tap water.

How about you?


So far so good. Most run-of-the-mill filters will take out the chlorine left in by our water treatment plants. But how about other stuff?


A pitcher-type filter, a fridge filter, might get out pathogens and chlorine—and even lead—but how about fluoride?


Fluoride? I thought we needed that for strong teeth.


Insert buzzer sound.


Fluoride in our drinking water—which many municipalities in our country add as a matter of course—is a totally different thing from fluoride applied at the dentist’s office, or even in a mouth rinse. We are absorbing it into our bodies. It is not hitting the target, our teeth, directly.


Fluoride is a known neurotoxin. Why would we want to ingest it when it’s been shown to reduce our IQs? Right?!


So I choose to use a serious-a@@ filter which pulls out the fluoride as well as the chlorine. I am not a shill for the company, but I’ll tell you the name if you twist my arm: Berkey.


Is that the only option?


No. We can also look into “reverse-osmosis” filtration systems, and we can choose to buy into spring water delivery services or the like.


The filters in the pitcher-type devices are granulated carbon. Those are fairly effective at removing the main culprits. Upgrading from the granulated we have carbon-block filters.

To get out the fluoride, we need micro-micro filtration. Reverse-osmosis does this by removing basically everything from the water—and wastes several gallons in the process of producing one gallon of purified water. Devices like my countertop “Berkey” use an inert, very dense media to capture the fluoride.



So we can remove the chlorine. We can remove the fluoride.


Does your water need this treatment? Find out using the Environmental Working Group search feature. It’s pretty cool what we can figure out from the comfort of our armchairs these days.


What if I have well water? Test it yourself, so you know what you’re getting. What you’re absorbing. If you have excessive minerals of any ilk lurking in your well you’re going to want to take charge of that.


Minerals are your body’s spark plugs. If there’s too much--or too little--things are going to misfire, so to speak.

Hmm. All we’re speaking about here is drinking water. How about other things we do with water? How about bathing?


Sounds like a great idea to me about now—Friday evening…a nice bath would be lovely…and I have a whole-house water filter, so I wouldn’t be bathing in a light version of our neighborhood swimming pool.

Chlorine in the bathing water. Yes. Think of the conditions we create with a bath or shower: heat, pores opening, steamy water vaporizing…our pores drink it in.


Buzzer sound.


Let’s not do that, okay?


Let’s bung a shower filter on the shower head if we’re not going to install a whole-house filter. Let’s hang a bath ball under the faucet to filter the water as it fills the tub.


There are many options to choose from. Simple installation. Easy replacement of the filters with use.


Boom.


Please take these tips under advisement—and reach out with questions. I am not an expert, but I’ve been filtering my water for years, so I’ve picked up a lot of good information. I’ve, ah, filtered out the bad information to leave us only with helpful nuggets.


Ha. Happy watering, y'all, and hit me up with questions.








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